SeaLife DC2000 How-To Photo Guide

with Tobias Friedrich

Tobias Friedrich started taking underwater photos in 2007.  Since then his images have been published in prestigious scuba diving magazines such as Sport Diver, Unterwasser, Tauchen, Scuba Diver, Through The Lens and many others.  In 2018 he won the coveted Underwater Photographer of the Year competition.   Tobias is always passionate for new challenges and up for new, creative ways in underwater photography.   Below, find some of his best images taken with the SeaLife DC2000 and Tobias’ advice on how to compose and capture the best shot in various underwater shooting scenarios. 

And keep in mind, with the DC2000, you don’t have to be a professional to get great results, simply follow these basic steps and you’ll capture some amazing photos.

tobias friedrich underwater diving photographer
Tobias Friedrich DC2000 SeaLife Underwater Cameras

Be Still, Move Gently and Slowly

Hawksbill Seaturtle
Elphinstone Reef, Egypt

One big advantage of compact cameras over big DSLR setups is that you can hold the camera easily into tiny spaces and still float above the reef to not disturb animals or touch corals. That close-up perspective was ideal to photograph the turtle while eating soft corals and not disturbing it. It was important to use the diffuser on the strobe to soften the light on the turtle and not to give it too hard of shadows.

Equipment: SeaLife DC2000, Sea Dragon Flash, 0.5x Wide Angle Dome Lens
Settings: ISO 125, f/4, 1/100s

Using a Narrow Beam Angle

Dark-Shouldered Snake Eel  
Malapascua, Philippines

Light is one of the most important things in underwater photography. In this case I used the spot light of the Sea Dragon 2100 Dual Beam Light to get a spot just right on the eel. To make the effect even more dramatic I had the light in my left hand and formed the light with my fingers to get a more narrow beam. With subject close to the ground it’s also important to get the cameras perspective as low as possible as well.

Equipment: SeaLife DC2000, Sea Dragon 2100 Dual Beam, 0.5x Wide Angle Dome Lens
Settings: ISO 125, f/8, 1/320s

Tobias Friedrich DC2000 SeaLife Underwater Cameras
silfra crack iceland underwater photos

Shooting Large Areas

The Silfra Crack 
Silfra, Iceland

If you are in a situation with great visibility or near large structures like rocks or reefs, it’s always a good idea to include a diver into the image so that the viewer is able to compare sizes of the natural surroundings to a human being. This photo was taken with a DC2000 and no light in Dive Mode with the new 0.5x Wide Angle Dome Lens. The water’s absolute clarity adds to the tremendous size and depth of the image.

Equipment: SeaLife DC20000.5x Wide Angle Dome Lens
Settings: f/4, 1/30s, ISO400

How to Get Great Shark Images

School of Sharks
Fakarava, French Polynesia

Photographing sharks is easy when you know what to do. By taking a test shot and adjusting the camera to over or underexpose you can control the blue in the background. Afterwards focus on the ground or anything else in the same distance like the sharks, hold the shutter button half pressed and wait for the sharks to be in a nice position before you press the shutter completely. Removing the diffusor from the strobe helps the light to reach further through the water.

Equipment: SeaLife DC2000
Settings: ISO125, f/4, 1/200s

school of sharks in fakarava french polynesia sea
tobias friedrich malapascua island philippines underwater photography

How to Create Macro Lighting Effects

Nudibranch
Malapascua Island, The Philippines

For this Nudibranch I used the DC-Series Super Macro Lens to be able to get closer to the subject and to have it bigger in the frame. Additionally I used the Sea Dragon 2100 Dual Beam Light from the very left side on spot function and also formed the light with my fingers to give the nudibranch just a touch of light. The blue and red background lights are coming from my DSLR, which I placed on the sandy bottom, while shooting with the DC2000 camera. It gave a nice additional effect.

Equipment: SeaLife DC2000, Sea Dragon 2100 Dual Beam, DC-Series Super Macro Lens
Settings: ISO 400, f/1.8, 1/30s

How to Get Best Colors

Vibrant Corals
Elphinstone Reef, Red Sea, Egypt

If you want to get good colors in your images, you need to be as close as possible to the corals so that the Sea Dragon Universal Flash can reach the subject and return to the camera. Red light can only travel up to five meters underwater – so if you are too far from the subject, your image will lack natural color. The SeaLife 0.5x Wide Angle Dome Lens is very important for images like this as it shortens the distance to the subject.

Equipment: SeaLife DC2000, Sea Dragon Flash, 0.5x Wide Angle Dome Lens
Settings: ISO 125, f/4, 1/125s

elphinstone reef red sea egypt underwater photos
painted frogfish blue sponge ocean photography

How to Get Close Wide Angle Shots

Painted Frogfish 
Male Atoll, Maldives

Not only wide-angle scenes can be taken with the SeaLife 0.5x Wide Angle Dome lens, but also close-focus wide-angle shots like with this nicely sitting Painted Frogfish in a blue sponge.

Equipment: SeaLife DC2000, Sea Dragon Flash, 0.5x Wide Angle Dome Lens
Settings: ISO 200, f/7.1, 1/200s

How to Get Best Perspective

Nudibranch
Alam Batu, Indonesia

When photographing small subjects like this beautiful Bali Solar Powered nudibranch (Phyllodesmium iriomotense), try to get your perspective as low as possible. Then with a spot light or torch (In this case the spot feature on the Sea Dragon 2100 Dual Beam) also very low to the ground and facing up slightly, the light will touch the animal and create a beautiful lighting effect.

Equipment: SeaLife DC2000, Sea Dragon 2100 Dual Beam, DC-Series Super Macro Lens
Settings: ISO 125, f/4, 1/125s

bali solar powered nudibranch alam batu indonesia ocean pictures
tiny shrimp ocean photography super macro lens

Shoot Close, Crop Closer

Tiny Shrimp
Alam Batu, Indonesia

Even though you can get really close with the Super Macro Lens, the quality of the DC2000 is good enough to crop the image a little bit as well to make the smaller creatures appear larger.

Equipment: SeaLife DC2000, Sea Dragon Flash, DC-Series Super Macro Lens
Settings: ISO 200, f/4, 1/100s

Show a Blue Background

Lionfish
Kubu, Indonesia

When taking underwater images like this, make sure that the subject floats over a nice background and that you are photographing slightly upwards to get as much blue water in the shot as possible.The diver in the background holding a dive torch makes the image perfect.

Equipment: SeaLife DC2000, Sea Dragon Flash, 0.5x Wide Angle Dome Lens
Settings: ISO 200, f/4, 1/100s

lionfish below surface dc2000 sea dragon flash
fish underwater photography rangiroa french polynesian sea

Be Calm and Patient

Reef Scene
Rangiroa, French Polynesia

Photographing fish underwater is not always easy, as they are easily scared and just turn their back to the camera. The trick is to stay calm, approach very slowly and wait for the fish to return to the same place and get used to the diver and the camera. Do a test shot to get light and background blue correct, press the shutter half to focus and wait for a good moment and a nice formation for the actual photo. Try it again and again if it doesn’t work out the first time.

Equipment: SeaLife DC2000, Sea Dragon Flash, 0.5x Wide Angle Dome Lens
Settings: ISO 200, f/7.1, 1/200s

Shooting in Cold Water

Wolffish
Akureyri, Iceland

Taking images in cold water like Iceland isn’t always easy because most cameras can’t be controlled easily with gloves. Luckily the SeaLife DC2000 has large buttons and controls so even in these harsh conditions, you are in full control over the camera, especially in situations like this when a Wolffish comes really close.

Equipment: SeaLife DC2000, Sea Dragon Flash, 0.5x Wide Angle Dome Lens
Settings: ISO 125, f/4, 1/125s

wolffish akureyri iceland underwater photo
sea turtle kubu indonesia sealife

Check Camera Settings Beforehand

Sea Turtle
Kubu, Indonesia

When you approach the animals very slowly they will remain calm and stay put to photograph. In a situation like this you might still only have two to three photos to take before the animal disappears. So it’s recommended to have the settings of your camera set correctly and tested before you approach the animal. Take your test shots on an inanimate object with same or similar lighting conditions.

Equipment: SeaLife DC2000, Sea Dragon Flash, 0.5x Wide Angle Dome Lens
Settings: ISO 200, f/4.5, 1/250s

Try New Lighting on Slow Animals

Scorpionfish
Malapascua, Philippines

Slow or non-moving sea creatures are predestined to test your lightning skills and experiment with your strobe. With light angle and intensity you can illuminate the parts of an image that are interesting and beautiful, like this Scorpionfish, and eliminate the unattractive background from the image.

Equipment: SeaLife DC2000, Sea Dragon 2100 Dual Beam’s Spot Function
Settings: ISO 120, f/11, 1/100s

scorpionfish malapascua philippines underwater photo lighting guide
reef scene bali indonesia ocean photography

Wait for the Right Moment

Reef Scene
Bali, Indonesia

If you’re shooting a reef-scape, waiting for the right moment is important in composing a good photo. Usually fish disappear from the reef when divers are close, but they’ll come back in little time if you wait and stay calm. When a fish swims into the image, be ready and press the shutter button.

Equipment: SeaLife DC2000, Sea Dragon Flash, 0.5x Wide Angle Dome Lens
Settings: ISO 125, f/2.5, 1/125s

How to Shoot in RAW

Nudibranch
Bali, Indonesia

When you shoot in Super Macro Auto-Focus mode and set your camera to capture JPG + RAW images, you will have the original image in RAW format with the ability to crop and edit it to your liking using popular image editing software such as Adobe Lightroom or Photoshop.

Equipment: SeaLife DC2000, Sea Dragon 2100 Dual Beam, DC-Series Super Macro Lens
Settings: ISO 125, f/8, 1/50s

Nudibranch super macro dc lens
seahorse kubu indonesia dc2000 super macro lens photography

Shooting Vertical Subjects

Seahorse
Kubu, Indonesia

When photographing vertical subjects, like this Seahorse, be sure to put your camera in portrait mode to be able to get as close as possible to the subject. That will result in the best quality image and preserve the intricate details of the creature.
 

Equipment: SeaLife DC2000, Sea Dragon 2100 Dual Beam, DC-Series Super Macro Lens
Settings: ISO 125, f/2.8, 1/320s

Shooting Diagonally

Sea Plane
Palau

Shoot diagonally so you can frame the entire subject into the photo, like the wings of this Japanese Sea Plane in Palau. Placing a diver next to the wreck gives the viewers an accurate idea of the scale of the object.

Equipment: SeaLife DC2000, Sea Dragon Flash, 0.5x Wide Angle Dome Lens

Settings: ISO 125, f/2.5, 1/320s

japanese sea plane underwater palau airplane wreck
underwater ocean cavern photography cave lighting

Creating Silhouettes

Palau

In a cave or cavern like this, you’ll always get a good silhouette image by shooting from the inside out. Place a diver into the open blue, possibly with a light, to create a great composition. 
 
Settings: ISO 125, f/2.0, 1/160s

Blue Background

Palau

Turtles often feed at the bottom or take a breath at the surface. In between, they ascend or descend quickly, it’s during this moment that is the perfect opportunity to shoot an image of the animal with a simple blue background. Be sure to not prevent the turtle from breathing or feeding by keeping some distance from the animal. 
 
Settings: ISO 125, f/5, 1/250s
sea turtle palau ocean japan
super macro zoom lens bali indonesia deep sea photography

Close Cropping

Bali, Indonesia

Super Macro mode gives you the opportunity to get really close to the animals and to be able to see all of their tiny details. The quality of the DC2000 is good enough to crop the image afterwards to even get closer to the subject.

Equipment: SeaLife DC2000, Sea Dragon 2100 Dual Beam, Super Macro Lens
Settings: ISO 125, f/5, 1/250s

 
 

Taking Clean Photos

Malapascua, Philippines

Having clean images with nothing that distracts from the main subject is important in wildlife photography. In this case this giant Frogfish was sitting under a rock with a nasty background behind it. To be able to mask the Frogfish and to get a clean, black background I used the spot function of the Sea Dragon 2100 Dual Beam Light so that the light only hits the fish and not the background.

Equipment:  SeaLife DC2000, SeaLife Sea Dragon 2100 Dual Beam

Settings: ISO 125, f/9, 1/200s

 
frogfish malapascua philippines underwater photography sea dragon 2100 dual beam light
rangiroa french polynesia underwater sealife dc2000 sea dragon flash photography

Great Composition

Rangiroa, French Polynesia 

Trying to shoot a simply composed image with shapes and objects usually results in a pleasing result for the viewer, like this image with a spherical coral head and two little fish above it.

Equipment:  SeaLife DC2000, Sea Dragon Flash, 0.75x Wide Angle Conversion Lens
Settings: ISO 125, f/1.8, 1/200s

Make Colors Pop

Palau

If you get to photograph wrecks try to work with diagonals to make the wreck fit in the image nicely. You can also just work with sunlight, but always go with the light (sun in the back) to make the colors come out. The shallower, the better, for ambient light shots.

Equipment:  SeaLife DC2000, Sea Dragon Flash, 0.75x Wide Angle Conversion Lens
Settings: 125, f/2.5, 1/320s

underwater airplane wreck photography palau ocean plane crash
underwater photography dc2000 sea dragon 2100 dual beam light

Fit Into Small Spaces

Bali Indonesia

The DC2000 is the perfect camera to squeeze into small holes where a larger camera system simply won’t fit. If your photo/video light doesn’t reach the subject completely, remove it from the grip or arm and light it up from the side or above.
 
Settings: ISO 200, f/11, 1/400s

Shooting Schooling Fish

Sharm El-Sheikh, Egypt

Shooting schooling fish is one of the most difficult things to do in underwater photography. You need to be patient and still until the school is very close and as dense as possible. Another diver acts as a model and also helps to keep the school together. 

 

Settings: ISO 125, f/5,6, 1/200s
 
schooling fish sharm el-seikh ehypt deep sea photography
DC2000 Underwater Camera how-to with Tobias Friedrich

Shooting Towards the Sun

Sharm El-Sheikh, Egypt

Photographing against sunlight usually results in a burning image of the sun and a dark foreground. To avoid this, place something in front of the sun and close the aperture as much as possible and increase your shutter speed. Be sure to use a flash or strobe in cases like this.
 
Settings: ISO 125, f/11, 1/250s

Creative Back-Lighting

Sharm El-Sheikh, Egypt

In addition to the light from your strobe, placing a light behind the object adds a colorful sunbeam-like effect. In this case, a Sea Dragon 2500 light head was used. This works best at night or inside wrecks. 
 
Settings: ISO 125, f/1,8, 1/30s
 
DC2000 Underwater Camera how-to with Tobias Friedrich
DC2000 Underwater Camera how-to with Tobias Friedrich

Rules of Composition

Bali, Indonesia

A small fish or object, when sitting on a monochromatic background, can create a great image when you follow the basic rules of composition and keep diagonal subjects in the image.
 
Equipment: SeaLife DC2000, Sea Dragon 2100 Dual Beam, Super Macro Lens
Settings: ISO 200, f/4, 1/250s

Low Visibility Situations

Hurghada, Egypt

In situations with low visibility, change your perspective and photograph upwards towards the surface to get as much light into the image as possible. The result is a much richer blue background, use your strobe to best bring out colors in your foreground subject. A wide angle lens will add shooting angle and fill your image with more of the colorful subject.
 
Settings: ISO 125, f/4, 1/250s
DC2000 Underwater Camera how-to with Tobias Friedrich

Use the Sun to Your Advantage

Bali, Indonesia

Adding the sun into your image is a desirable effect.  The problem is that the large sunburst can white out your shot. To avoid this, increase the DC2000 shutter speed to 1/1250s.  The Sea Dragon Universal Flash can synchronize at that speed and get good light and color into the foreground.

Settings: ISO 200, f/10, 1/1250s
 

Testing Your Skills

Kubu, Indonesia

Anemonefish are good subjects to test your skills underwater. They stay in place and allow you to get very close. The most important thing is timing the shutter button at the right moment so the fish looks good in the frame. With a little practice, you’ll get the perfect shot!
 
Settings: SO 200, f/8, 1/320s

Photographing Difficult Subjects

Palau

Marine animals, like this Hawksbill turtle, are often some of the most difficult subjects to photograph. But if you remain calm, move very slowly toward the animal, and avoid making too many bubbles, they’ll let you come close.
Settings: ISO 125, f/2.8, 1/160s
 

Waiting it Out

Brother Islands, Egypt

If you find a nice spot in the corals, wait a few minutes with the camera in position until a fish swims into the image. Most fish will return after a few minutes, after first fleeing from the divers bubbles.
 
Settings: ISO 125, f/4, 1/30s
 

Using Available Light

Shaab Claudia, Fury Shoals, Egypt

Sometimes it’s better to shut off the strobes or lights and to just work with the available light in a shot. The sun’s rays in the caverns come out best with a slow shutter speed.
 
Settings:  ISO 125, f/4.5, 1/25s
 

Shooting at Shallow Depths

Marsa Alam, Egypt

With bright sun in the background, and with a shallow depth of less than 10m/30’ from the surface, you won’t need any lights or strobes to be able to get nice colors from the reef.  As you move closer or deeper, consider adding strobes or LED lighting.
 
Settings: ISO 125, f/2.8, 1/400s
 

Shark Portrait Tips

Brother Island, Egypt

For shark photography, wait until the animal is as close as it will get so that the shark sits nicely centered in the full frame of the image before you press the shutter.  If you take the image too early, the shot will lack color and detail because the animal is too far away. 
 
Settings:  ISO 125, f/5.6, 1/400s
 

Using Lights Creatively

SS Thistlegorm Wreck, Sharm El Sheikh, Egypt
 
Sea Dragon lights can be removed quickly and easily from their Flex-Connect mount and your camera set with just the press of a button. Remove your light and place it (or place several lights) behind a subject, such as this part of a wreck, to create an interesting and indirect light effect.
 
Settings:  ISO 125, f/1.8, 1/25s
 

Highlight the Best Part

Brother Island, Egypt

If you aren’t able to photograph the complete wreck, try to highlight interesting parts of it. Place your subject in front of blue water, along with a model, to make the part of the wreck stand out even more.
 
Settings: ISO 125, f/4, 1/100s
 

Using Depth and Dimension

Marsa Alam, Egypt
 
Placing subjects at different distances creates depth and dimension in the image.  Mind your aperture and settings as the distance from foreground to background changes. 
 
Settings:  ISO 125, f/2.8, 1/450s
 

Capturing Quick Creatures

Lembeh Strait, North Sulawesi, Indonesia
 
Quick swimming clownfish are not always easy to catch with a camera. So take focus on a point of the anemone where the fish will be likely to appear, and press the shutter button quickly once it swims into focus.
 
Settings: ISO 125, f/2.2, 1/80s
 

Narrow Beam Effects

Lembeh Strait, North Sulawesi, Indonesia
 
These Flamboyant Cuttlefish eggs are best illuminated from the back so that the juvenile bodies can be seen best. Just partly lighting the clutch from above with a narrow beam or torch gives it even more effect.
 
Settings: ISO 125, f/1.8, 1/320
 

Subjects on the Ocean Floor

Lembeh Strait, North Sulawesi, Indonesia
 
While photographing subjects that are on the ocean floor, it’s best to get close very slowly as to not disturb any sand so your view remains clear. You also risk distressing the sea creatures if you get too close, so remain calm and quiet in order to get the best shot.
 
Settings: ISO 125, f/2.5, 1/200s
 
 
 

No External Lens Needed

Lembeh Strait, North Sulawesi, Indonesia
 
Cuttlefish aren’t shy but also typically won’t let divers too close. In most cases, they’re too far for a Macro lens, yet too close for a Wide Angle lens. In a situation like this, take the shot without an external lens attached, and allow the camera take the image with its standard focal length.
 
Settings: ISO 125, f/3.2, 1/200s
 

Using the “Golden Ratio”

Lembeh Strait, North Sulawesi, Indonesia
 
Close-up lenses are best to use with small subjects like this Hairy Frogfish. By not placing the fish directly in the center, but rather in the “golden ratio”, which is about in one third of the image, the subject will be very well composed.
 
Settings: 1/200s, f/3.2, ISO 125
 
 
 

Veritcal vs. Horizonal

Lembeh Strait, North Sulawesi, Indonesia
 
Take a vertical image when the upright alignment of the subject lets you get closer to the animal. You’ll also have a better quality photo vs. taking the image horizontally and later cropping it.
 
Equipment:SeaLife DC2000, Sea Dragon 4500, Super Macro Lens
Settings: ISO 125, f/3.2, 1/200s
 

Using Auto Focus on Quick Subjects

Cape Point, Cape Town, South Africa
 
Fast moving animals like this blue shark are a challenging subject with auto-focus cameras. For best results with the DC2000, focus on your buddy or an object one or two meters away, hold the shutter button half pressed until the focus is sharp, continue to hold the shutter and wait until the shark comes into the frame before you fully press the button.
 
Settings: ISO 125, f/3.5, 1/200s
 
 

Wait for the Animal To Swim into Frame

False Bay, Cape Town, South Africa
 
For subjects like super-fast moving Brown Fur Seals you can use the same technique as with Blue Sharks: Take the focus on a fixed point of similar distance and hold the shutter button until the animal swims into the frame, then snap the image. But seals are so fast that you actually need to lead your subject; press the shutter before the animal is in the frame. Aim for only one shot per pass by of the seal, try this over and over again until you get good results.
 
Settings: ISO 125, f/2.8, 1/250s
 

Avoid a Dirty Background

Lembeh Strait, North Sulawesi, Indonesia
 
Nudibranches, like this Solar-Powered Nudibranch, are often found in muck areas with a lot of sand and cloudy background. Stay with the Nudibranch until it crawls up to a higher point so that you can take an image from the bottom up, pulling it away from the dirty background.
 
Settings:1/200s, f/3.2, ISO 125
 
 

Try a Low Perspective

Cape Point, Cape Town, South Africa
 
When photographing sharks, a slightly lower perspective below the animal and aiming upwards gives a nice view of the white belly of the shark against the blue background.
 
Settings: ISO 125, f/3.5, 1/200s
 

Getting a Front View

Lembeh Strait, North Sulawesi, Indonesia
 
Side views of animals or fishes are nice, but if you get the chance, take an image straight from the front, like this cuttlefish. The important thing is that both eyes are visible and in focus.
 
Settings:ISO 125, f/3.2, 1/200s
 
 

Standing Out Against the Blue

Cape Point, Cape Town, South Africa
 
Framing animals “into the blue” makes them stand out and the subject won’t blend into a busy background so that the viewer’s focus is fully on the animal.
 
Settings: ISO 125, f/3.5, 1/200s
 

Giving Perspective

Tasiilaq, Greenland  

On subjects where you have no scale or dimension, I like to have a diver in the image to get the size relationship. The DC2000 also works perfectly in these icy conditions in sub-freezing water temperatures.

Equipment: SeaLife DC2000, Sea Dragon Universal Flash, SeaLife 0.5x Dome Lens
Settings: ISO 125, f/2.0, 1/125s

 
 
 

Getting an Okay “Bokeh”

Lembeh Strait, North Sulawesi, Indonesia

With a low f-stop, or open aperture, the background becomes unfocused. Use this technique to create a nice bokeh (or special “blurred” background), which adds to the overall photo composition. 

Equipment: SeaLife DC2000, Sea Dragon 4500, Super Macro Lens
Settings: 1/640s, f/1.8, ISO 125

Shooting the Perfect Reef

Woodhouse Reef, Strait of Tiran, Sharm el-Sheikh, Egypt

Photographing reefs is almost never easy because most of the time, there’s an ugly rock or a section which is not covered with coral in the frame. Try to search and find a spot where the frame is packed with life and nothing unattractive is inside the image.

Equipment: SeaLife DC2000, Sea Dragon Universal Flash, SeaLife 0.5x Dome Lens
Settings: ISO 125, f/4, 1/400s

 
 
 

Shoot Straight, Not Down

Lembeh Strait, North Sulawesi, Indonesia

Taking images from the side and making eye contact with the animal is much better than taking a shot from the top looking down. Diagonal views help to get more life into the image.

Equipment: SeaLife DC2000, Sea Dragon 4500, Super Macro Lens
Settings: 1/640s, f/13.2, ISO 125

Shooting Sea Fans

Banda Neira, Indonesia

It’s always nice to place a model around sea fans so the viewer sees an additional element in the image. Make sure that the model holds a dive light and get the legs straight and together so the scene looks serene and natural.

Equipment: SeaLife DC2000, Sea Dragon Universal Flash, SeaLife 0.5x Dome Lens
Settings: ISO 125, f/2.2, 1/200s

 
 
 

Shooting with Ice

Tasiilaq, Greenland  

With icebergs, adding a diver like this freediver is important for creating scale and reference, which benefits the image.  And unlike a reef, it’s quite alright to touch the ice. 

Equipment: SeaLife DC2000, Sea Dragon Universal Flash, SeaLife 0.5x Dome Lens
Settings: ISO 125, f/2.0, 1/125s

Shooting Anemones

Banda Neira, Indonesia

Closed anemones are an ideal subject for photography as clownfish tend to stay inside the anemone and won’t swim away. Make sure to capture them in the right moment when they are looking towards the camera.

Equipment: SeaLife DC2000, Sea Dragon 3000 Auto
Settings: ISO 125, f/4.5, 1/320s

 
 
 

Using a Narrow Beam

Bali, Indonesia

Besides being one of the highest rated dive lights, you can also take pictures with the Sea Dragon Mini 900! Its narrow beam is ideal to point at an animal like this Mantis Shrimp, yet avoids showing the potentially nasty background by just focusing on the animal itself.  SeaLife offers their SL98104 YS adapter for this light so you can mount it to your camera or arm system. 

Equipment: SeaLife DC2000, SeaLife Sea Dragon Mini 900
Settings: ISO 125, f/3.5, 1/250s

Framing Sharks

Cape Point, Cape Town, South Africa
 
Centering animals in the middle of the image, especially when photographing sharks, is important. This gives a nice perspective so the viewer can see both eyes of the animal. 
 
Equipment:SeaLife DC2000, Sea Dragon Flash, 0.5x Dome Lens
Settings: ISO 125, f/4.5, 1/250s
 
 

The Mimic Octopus

Bali, Indonesia

Mimic octopuses are never easy to spot, or to photograph, as they frequently move around once they’re out of their hole. Wait until the octopus rests for a moment before taking your pictures. Also, make sure you don’t harass the animal in any way.

Equipment: SeaLife DC2000, Sea Dragon 3000 Auto
Settings: ISO 125, f/4, 1/500

Composing Backgrounds

Bali, Indonesia

If you can’t find the right background while photographing coral crabs, try changing your approach by shooting sideways or upside down to get the best color of the coral and the crab into the image.

Equipment: SeaLife DC2000, Sea Dragon 3000 Auto, Super Macro Lens
Settings: ISO 125, f/4, 1/200

 
 

The Egyptian Dugong

Port Ghalib, El Sheik Malik, Egypt

When shooting rare or shy animals, it may be that you only have one chance to get the shot, so you need to have the camera settings right beforehand. To make sure to have the correct settings, take a test shot on your dive buddy.

Equipment:SeaLife DC2000, Sea Dragon Flash, 0.5x Dome Lens
Settings: 1/500s, f/4, ISO 125

Take Your Time at Cleaning Stations

Bluff Point, Island of Gubal, Egypt, Red Sea

Capturing the behavior of an animal will result in a much stronger image than just a passing ID shot. Use patience at cleaning stations with as little movement as possible and you’ll get much better interactions with images full of life. 

Equipment:SeaLife DC2000, Sea Dragon Flash, 0.5x Dome Lens
Settings: 1/250s, f/4, ISO 125

 
 

Focus on the Eyes

Bali, Indonesia

Portrait shots, especially of morays, work very well if you have eye contact with the animal. This can be only one eye from the side, but even better on both eyes from the very front. It’s absolutely important that in all perspectives that the focus is centered on the eyes and not somewhere else.

Equipment: SeaLife DC2000, SeaLife Sea Dragon Mini 900
Settings: ISO 125, f/3.5, 1/250s

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